Look what happens when I leave town for a couple of days

I traveled to Western Kentucky on Thursday and apparently missed a major weathergasm here in the Midsouth with a tornado reported over Germantown, tornado warning sirens blaring in the Memphis area and breathless wall to wall coverage from the TV folks. A friend of mine telephoned me while he was traveling from Bowling Green, KY to Knoxville by way of Nashville. My friend, who is a former TV meterologist, called to tell me about what he called great weather coverage by WLAC radio in Nashville. He told me it was actually better than any TV coverage he has seen. I didn’t get the details as left the message on my cell phone. I know Jack and his lovely bride Pam read this blog on a regular basis, so maybe he will wade in and share his thoughts on why he thought the radio coverage was so great.
I also saw in the Sunday CA that a kidney stone passed by William Shatner sold for 25-thousand dollars. No word on the size of it. I need to get in touch with former co-worker Jamey Tucker to see if he wants to put his kidney stones on Ebay. He’s been down for the count this entire week dealing with kidney stones. My dad suffered from them and I’ve been told by women who have dealt with both kidney stones and child birth that they will take the pain of child birth anytime.

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2 Comments on “Look what happens when I leave town for a couple of days”

  1. jack church Says:

    Hey Joe, yes we are on line and glad you got my message. The radio coverage out of Nashville was excellent. As the storms began to move in, WLAC began to simulcast non stop coverage on the AM side as well as two FM stations. I was just a few miles ahead of the storm driving south on I-65 when it hit. What made the coverage so compelling was the listeners calling in with eyewitness reports. These were genuine people simply describing what they were seeing without the usual theatrics that we so often see with television. They were also very calm and direct with their comments. At times you had listeners simply walking through the damage and giving accounts over the phone as they walked their neighborhoods. You could feel the genuine care and concern they had for their neighbors and the fact they did not have a producer in the ear piece giving them direction. On the station side you had a couple of news folks and a meteorologist from the weather channel radio network taking care of the storm tracking, watches and warnings. Again, these folks were very genuine and calm with clear, concise information sprinkled between the eyewitness accounts. In summary my main point has to be how the stations used their listeners to tell the story. Television producers, anchors and reporters could certainly learn something from this.

  2. jack church Says:

    Hey Joe, yes we are on line and glad you got my message. The radio coverage out of Nashville was excellent. As the storms began to move in, WLAC began to simulcast non stop coverage on the AM side as well as two FM stations. I was just a few miles ahead of the storm driving south on I-65 when it hit. What made the coverage so compelling was the listeners calling in with eyewitness reports. These were genuine people simply describing what they were seeing without the usual theatrics that we so often see with television. They were also very calm and direct with their comments. At times you had listeners simply walking through the damage and giving accounts over the phone as they walked their neighborhoods. You could feel the genuine care and concern they had for their neighbors and the fact they did not have a producer in the ear piece giving them direction. On the station side you had a couple of news folks and a meteorologist from the weather channel radio network taking care of the storm tracking, watches and warnings. Again, these folks were very genuine and calm. Again, my main point has to be how the stations used their listeners to tell the story.


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